Friday, June 11, 2010

I am having a real problem

with the phrase "no problem'. For years, my thank yous have been sincerely meant, and You are welcome has been the answer. Welcome sounds as if the responder has really been glad to render a service. On the other hand, "no problem: sounds to me as if the service wouldn't be offered had it not been convenient. This bothers me every time I hear it, though I continue to say you are welcome. Does this bother anyone else, or am I too picky?

11 comments:

Cathy said...

Doesn't bother me as much as I find it interesting - I think it might be a generational thing as I notice younger folks using it.

MJ said...

You're right that it is the younger generation using it. I think it probably indicates less dedication to a gracious response to 'thank you' than to the facat that it the service does not inconvenience them, Or maybe it is just a learned thing - from each other at the age level from which it is comingl I expect the teacher in me is usually hard to shut up - but I manage to repress it and not correct them. Gotta flow with the times. Thanks for your reaction, Cathy.

Mary Beth said...

That is one of Ken's great pet peeves! When they say "no problem" he says, "You're welcome."

:) Married to a curmudgeon & glad of it!

MJ said...

I knew I really liked Ken. I still say "you're welcome' also. Arent' you glad you have a curmudgeon for a mother ?

Sarah said...

OK, now for my 2 cents worth. I say "no problem" all the time. For me it means that it was no problem to help you or do something for you. As if to say "Don't mention it". A way to put whoever you did something for at ease, if you will. As for Qualan, it is a part of her culture. Everyone says "no problem" where she's from. I guess it just depends on who you ask.

MJ said...

Ok, I guess I have to get off my high horse.

Mary Beth said...

Ken's staying on his, so don't rush getting off unless you feel like it. :)

Sarah said...

I don't think it's about high horses. I think it''s about culture and what you're used to. Qualan says that on most of the carribean islands they say "no problem" routinely. Just know that it is not a slight of any kind for someone to say "no problem". And try to think about who is saying it. And why.

No problem, mon.

Sarah said...

What do you think of that, eh?

MJ said...

thinking.......

Sarah said...

Well don't think too hard about it. It really isn't a problem. Everyone likes what they are accustomed to. It's just a matter of habit. But don't think of it as a flippant reply. From me it is the same as you're welcome. :)